There are many of us that enjoy the winter views, but don’t like the cold weather. Then there are those Michiganders that embrace every Natural resource our great state of Michigan offers, including all of the adventure that Winter brings to outdoor activities. I’ve only been to Munising once so far, it’s a beautiful place to visit and we’ll be back, hopefully this year.

TIM TROMBLEY

Now if you embrace winter, you will find Munising in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, next to The Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore. A part of our state that has unlimited natural wonders and lots of things to do outdoors. What do people do in Munising during the winter months? Let’s explore the options:

SNOWMOBILING
One of the more popular winter go to activities is Snowmobiling in the Munising and the Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore. There you will thrill to many miles of unplowed roads. While in the park these roads lead to many attractions Like:
Miners Castle
Miners Falls
The Log Slide

The Munising trail system is groomed and goes for hundreds of miles to places like Shingleton, Grand Marais, Seney, Marquette, Chatham, Manistique, Rapid River and others. If that sounds exciting, but you don’t own a Snowmobile, you can rent one at many local dealers. CLICK FOR WEB SITE

TIM TROMBLEY

ICE CLIMBING
Sounds kind of crazy to me, but Americans seem to enjoy it. This activity normally occurs from December through March. Due to the Munising area sporting a huge amount of ice, veteran ice climbers from all over the world come here to play. The Michigan Ice Fest happens on the second weekend of February, happens annually and features seminars by world class climbers. They also have classes for beginners. It’s a sport that gets more popular every year. (Be aware Covid could affect this annual event)

SNOWSHOEING
The Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore provides outstanding snowshoeing opportunities. With over 33,000 acres to play in you will find trails going to Wagner, Twin Memoria, Tannery, Munising, and Miners Falls provide awesome views of the frozen falls. You will also find more trails that criss-cross through the lakeshore for miles through quiet forests. Keep your eyes open for signs of winter wildlife while you are enjoying the views. You can also check out the Valley Spur Snowman Trail. It’s a 1.8 mile loop which is moderately challenging and provides views of the Valley Spur Creek.  CLICK FOR WEB SITE

VIEWING ICE CAVES, FROZEN WATERFALLS AND ICE FORMATIONS
The wintertime beauty of the frozen waterfalls and ice formations is something to see. You will find several easy access options available. Stop and view the ice formations along the ledges between Munising Falls and Sand Point. Then head over and park at Sand Point beach and take a walk along Sand Point Road. You will see ice visible through the trees. When you see packed snow trails leading from the road, follow those to reach the formations. Another popular spot is Munising Falls, just a short hike away to the parking area. From the parking area it’s 800 feet of packed trail leading to the falls. The main platform is open for viewing in the winter. Climbing on or around the falls is not allowed during this time of year. You also have Wagner Falls just outside of Munising. You can park in the small area near the entrance, then about a half mile walk to the falls.

CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING
If you enjoy cross-country skiing, this is the place to be! Located five miles outside of Munising, the Hiawatha National Forest Valley Spur Trail is a groomed 27-mile trail system. Gorgeous scenery and challenging trail options make this a must-do for cross-country skiing enthusiasts. CLICK HERE FOR WEB SITE

So, are you ready to get out and really embrace winter in Michigan? We’ve provided lot’s of options for your wintertime adventure. Be sure and plan ahead and dress well for the season. Get out and enjoy another one of the many hidden treasures of our great state of Michigan.

Photos and information courtesy of the Munising Facebook Page

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