We get it. There are folks that don't believe in this whole coronavirus thing. It's a conspiracy. A hoax.

Numbers and science be damned.

It's a control thing and so on.

And for some of you, it's an inconvenience.

Mind you, it's your choice.

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However, more stores and businesses are requiring you to wear them before you enter their establishments. And for some places to open, they have guidelines they have to follow and it includes the face mask/face covering requirement.

CDC recommends wearing cloth face coverings in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain (e.g., grocery stores and pharmacies) especially in areas of significant community-based transmission. (CDC)

It's a simple act that protects you and others.

But there are folks out there that believe otherwise.

They don't think they work and actually believe wearing a face mask is harmful.

See the face mask safety poster below.

While inhaling high levels of carbon dioxide is dangerous, this is very unlikely to happen from wearing a cloth face mask — especially if you’re only wearing it for short periods of time. (Cleveland Clinic)

And now the anti-face mask movement has stepped their game up.

Introducing the Face Mask Exempt Card.

Looks official enough right? All nice and laminated.

Appears to have all the bells and whistles. Department of Justice. Americans with Disabilities Act. A violation reporting number. And a stern warning of if access is denied that you and your business or organization will be reported.

Kinda like a gym pass from back in the day that let you get out of doing any physical exercises. A doctors note.

There's only one problem. Actually, several.

It's totally fake.

The Department of Justice has officially warned against fake cards that provide a medically exempt status from wearing face masks, citing the Americans with Disabilities Act, or ADA. "These postings were not issued by the Department and are not endorsed by the Department," the statement read, in part. "The Department urges the public not to rely on the information contained in these postings and to visit ADA.gov for ADA information issued by the Department." (Popculture)