Virtual learning has just begun and a Michigan high school has already been hacked by someone displaying a gun during a Zoom class.

Someone wearing a disguise and pointing a gun at his or her own head infiltrated a virtual learning class at Godfrey-Lee High School in Wyoming on Wednesday (9/2).

The incident has been investigated by the school and the Wyoming Department of Public Safety and it is believed the hack originated from out of state.

In a statement to WZZM-TV in Grand Rapids, the district said it is working to thwart such hacks in the future.

"Immediate measures have been taken to prevent unauthorized access to our classrooms from happening again and to maintain the safety of our classrooms."

Surprisingly, virtual classrooms around the country are frequently being hacked because students have intentionally shared Zoom IDs or Google codes in order to help hackers interrupt classes as a prank.

Here's what parents and teachers can do:

Virtual platforms like Zoom and Google Meet have waiting room features that allow teachers to choose who they admit to the meeting.

CNET's Laura Hautala tells CBS Sacramento it's up to school personnel to learn how to use technology in order to stay one step ahead of hackers.

“I think teachers should be mentally preparing (for hacks),” Hautala said. “School I.T. departments and school systems in general really need to be thinking about how to train teachers because this is a new system still.”

Still, hackers can spoof email addresses to make it appear like they belong in the classroom. Hautala says that teachers need to be on the lookout for students that may be logged in twice.

Hautala suggests that parents of younger children should ensure that passwords are unique and strong. Older children should be encouraged to have unique passwords for each account and know the importance of not sharing passwords with others.

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