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Just when you thought coronavirus was complicated enough, the Michigan Supreme Court's ruling on Friday makes navigating our way through the pandemic exponentially more complicated.

Don't burn your facemasks just yet.

The Michigan Supreme Court ruled on Friday that a 1945 law is unconstitutional, therefore impacting many of the Executive Orders issued by Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer since the beginning of April. Attorney General Dana Nessel says her office will no longer enforce orders related to COVID-19, and therefore police agencies in Michigan will likely follow suit.

But wait. Governor Whitmer has stated that her mandates will remain in effect for 21 days following the ruling. Some argue that she doesn't have the authority to do so.

And there's more. Some Michigan counties have already issued emergency coronavirus orders that mandate coronavirus safety measures remain in place.

Oakland County issued an emergency health order on Saturday (10/3) that requires all residents to wear facemasks outside their homes.

Ingham County issued four orders on Sunday (10/4) that require residents to wear face coverings, limit the size of indoor and outdoor gatherings, require restaurants to seat customers at no more than 50% of capacity, and require businesses to continue to carry out health screenings for their employees who have returned to work.

In addition, privately owned businesses, stores, and other establishments that serve the public are still free to require employees and customers to wear face coverings and enforce social distancing guidelines in order to protect their employees -- and they can refuse service to anyone who chooses not to comply.

And finally, I'm not here to debate whether or not facemasks should be worn. If we disagree, I won't convince you and you won't convince me. But I think we can all agree that Friday's ruling has made an already complicated situation even more difficult to navigate.