The Pandemic Has Taught Us A Thing Or Two About Schooling

Once Covid-19 hit, we had to react and do things on the fly and fast. We had to adapt and stay safe. All of us. After we got done hording all the toilet paper and disinfecting wipes we could, we set forth and got ready to work and learn from home.

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Parents, teachers, kids all had to switch gears. We had to get used to Zoom and Teams meetings and classes. Internet plans had to be changed, laptops and computers had to be upgraded, and spare rooms had to be converted into work from home offices and classrooms.

Parents had double duty. Working from home and keeping kids motivated to learn from home. And they couldn't wait for the kids to get back to school. There was a huge push from the government too. Let's get this done. Teachers were concerned about safety but they made the leap and were making the online classroom work.

In person learning returned but we learned quite a few things. And some things were about to change for good.

Say Goodbye To Snow Days In NYC

New York City released is school calendar for 2021-2022 academic year Tuesday, and there are some pandemic practices carrying over from the past year.

The most notable change is that there will be no more snow days, with students expected to log in from home if it becomes necessary to close school buildings. (abc7ny)

The systems have been put in place and now schools are going to use them.

Kids are not happy about this one at all.

Say Hello To Options In Mason

Closer to home, Mason Public Schools sees this as an opportunity to offer options. Next year you get to pick where you'd like to learn from.

Folks were asking in the comments section if you could switch from virtual to in person after you've started virtually. Here's their response.

Thank you for your question. The commitment to the Bulldog Virtual Academy is for at least one full trimester and student placements will not be changed in the middle of the trimester. (MPS Facebook)

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