Dana Nessel, Michigan’s Attorney General, along with Consumers Energy are kicking off a campaign to make sure Michigan residents are able to access tens of millions of dollars in federal, state and local dollars in an effort to help Michigan homes and businesses pay winter heating bills.

WILX reports:

“No one should go without warmth or comfort in their own home when they can have access to so many dollars here in Michigan, starting with a single phone call,” Nessel said. “We know February’s brutal cold is leaving our friends and neighbors with high energy bills, but they should know they can take action now that can make a huge difference.”

Nessel and Consumer Energy are teaming up after two weeks of exceptionally cold temperatures in February caused furnaces to run more often than usual. The cost of that heat will be reflected in customer bills that are set to arrive this month.

All it takes is a phone call to get access to these dollars. Lauren Youngdahl Snyder, Consumers Energy’s vice president of customer experience, told WILX that

“Consumers Energy is working right now to help many Michiganders who could use support due to the twin challenges of the pandemic and the cold snap."

"The new federal stimulus and other sources are making tens of millions of dollars available to help with energy bills.”

If you are having a hard time paying your energy bills, you should call 2-1-1. That’s a free service that will hook you up with nonprofit agencies across Michigan. You also have the option of going to mi211.org. Other options for help:

Click here for State Emergency Relief (SER).

Contact Consumers Energy at 800-477-5050 for payment arrangements.

Click here to apply for Home Heating Credit.

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On top of the state and federal aid, Consumers Energy has paid $15 million dollars since fall to help folks who can’t pay their energy bills. So far Consumers has paid out over $21 million helping community issues related to the Covid-19 pandemic.

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